Film Reviews - - by Rob Wallis

REVIEW: Knight of Cups

REVIEW: Knight of Cups

Soma Cod Overnight Delivery Knight of Cups is a film you could drown in – a vast thematic ocean lapping against the distant shore of some grand, obscure vision. As a director-philosopher (or should that be philosopher-director?), Terrence Malick has always experimented with the medium, but his latest work seems to mark the crossing of a conceptual Rubicon.

Soma fast delivery no doctors Eschewing such contrivances as plot and character almost entirely, Knight of Cups follows an itinerant screenwriter, Rick (Christian Bale), around Los Angeles and its surrounding environs, the film is directly engaged in a search for meaning and so diligently wades through meaninglessness. Malick’s camera drifts close behind the silently watchful Rick as he makes his way through lavish parties, down skid row, across desert flats, even via the Paramount back-lot.

http://www.bigleaguekickball.com/about/ Soma online ordering next day VISA Mastercard accepted Less cinema than poetry told through images, Knight of Cups is replete with literary quotations – from ‘The Pilgrim’s Progress’, from the apocryphal ‘Hymn of the Pearl’ – but there is nothing at the center of Malick’s quest; no pearl, no progress, no common nucleus of human experience. There’s experience aplenty – kissing, running into the sea fully clothed, luminous body paint – but no more significance to any of it than a handful of holiday snapshots.

Characters pass like ships in the light – Cate Blanchett as Rick’s physician ex-wife; Teresa Palmer as the “High Priestess” stripper; Rick’s bullish father (Brian Dennehy) and volatile brother (Wes Bentley). Jason Clarke appears silently in one scene, presumably a victim of Malick’s legendary editing process. You’d never know of the director’s practice of “torpedoing” — unexpectedly throwing cast members into scenes to force improvisation — because no real conflict reaches the surface.

Knight of Cups could play on a loop at a modern art installation without much loss. The patrons could pause momentarily to glean what they can from Emmanuel Lubezki’s radiant cinematography – bright, pale, and naturally lit – or one of Malick’s cryptic snatches of voice-over – the rows of palm trees that line the L.A boulevards tell us, for instance, that anything’s possible — before simply moving on. Hanan Townshend’s ethereal string score is certainly buoying.

The film is all in the motion, like the breaking of waves; the journey rather than any single arrival or conversation. In this it resembles a 118-minute version of Sean Penn’s present-day perambulations in Tree of Life – reverently wandering between skyscrapers and riding in lifts as though travel were somehow the essence of meaning instead of a necessary transition between point A and point B.

This feels less like cinema than indulgence, therapy even, that, like Woody Allen and his recent travelogues – which are at least entertaining – is difficult to dismiss as navel-gazing simply because the navel in question is so remarkably well composed. Those few impressions that linger – the jaws of a dog, plunging futilely into a pool to recover a lost toy – endure only as curios; detached, adrift from that work that should encompass them.

One of Rick’s myriad lovers, Della (played by Imogen Poots), informs him, “You’re not looking for love. You’re looking for a love experience.” Knight of Cups is not a film but a cinematic experience, a canvas onto which you are almost obliged to project your own feelings, your own interpretations. It’ll either sweep you away or leave you marooned.

http://www.bigleaguekickball.com/category/press/ SOMA OVERNIGHT COD Knight of Cups order soma cash on delivery is now on general release across the UK

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Rob Wallis is a graduate of the London Film School and a recent member of the Online Film Critics Society. He also keeps a rarely updated, bare-bones blog, Of All the Film Blogs, (www.ofallthefilmblogs.blogspot.com). You can follow him on Twitter @robertmwallis.

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